#BlackHistoryMonth Movie Night

This year, we are celebrating Black History Month by recognizing the immense contribution of Black filmmakers and actors to the silver screen. So grab your popcorn and start streaming!

Cornerstones of Black Cinema

From the grit of everyday characters to the poetic images that continue to influence, here are some of the pivotal pieces that define Black cinema.

From top left to bottom right:

  • Do The Right Thing (Spike Lee, 1989): On the hottest day of the year on a street in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, everyone’s hate and bigotry smolders and builds until it explodes into violence.
  • Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash, 1991): Languid look at the Gullah culture of the sea islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia where African folk-ways were maintained well into the 20th Century and was one of the last bastion of these mores in America.
  • Eve’s Bayou (Kasi Lemmons, 1997): Husband, father and womanizer Louis Batiste is the head of an affluent family, but it’s the women who rule this gothic world of secrets, lies and mystic forces.
  • Get Out (Jordan Peele, 2017): A young African-American visits his white girlfriend’s parents for the weekend, where his simmering uneasiness about their reception of him eventually reaches a boiling point.
  • Killer of Sheep (Charles Burnett, 1978): Set in the Watts area of Los Angeles, a slaughterhouse worker must suspend his emotions to continue working at a job he finds repugnant, and then he finds he has little sensitivity for the family he works so hard to support.
  • Boyz n’ The Hood (John Singleton, 1991): Follows the lives of three young males living in the Crenshaw ghetto of Los Angeles, dissecting questions of race, relationships, violence, and future prospects.

Iconic Black Performances

Some roles get to be defined by the actors that portray them. Here are some unforgettable performances that showcase the epitome of cinematic acting.

  • Viola Davis in Fences (2016)
  • Chadwick Boseman in Black Panther (2018)
  • Whoopi Goldberg in The Color Purple (1985)
  • Lupita Nyong’o in 12 Years a Slave (2013)
  • Angela Bassett in What’s Love Got to Do with It (1993)
  • Morgan Freeman in Invictus (2009)
  • Denzel Washington in Malcolm X (1992)
  • Michael B. Jordan in Just Mercy (2019)
  • Danny Glover in To Sleep with Anger (1991)

Black History through Movies

Films can bring to life stories of historical struggle and brilliance in a way that simultaneously captures and educates the audience. These movies depict some of the heroes that marked Black History.

  • Hidden Figures (Theodore Melfi, 2016): The story of a team of female African-American mathematicians who served a vital role in NASA during the early years of the U.S. space program.
  • Harriet (Kasi Lemmons, 2019): The extraordinary tale of Harriet Tubman’s escape from slavery and transformation into one of America’s greatest heroes, whose courage, ingenuity, and tenacity freed hundreds of slaves and changed the course of history.
  • Judas & The Black Messiah (Shaka King, 2021): Bill O’Neal infiltrates the Black Panther Party per FBI Agent Mitchell and J. Edgar Hoover. As Party Chairman Fred Hampton ascends, falling for a fellow revolutionary en route, a battle wages for O’Neal’s soul.
  • Selma (Ava DuVernay, 2014): A chronicle of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s campaign to secure equal voting rights via an epic march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965.
  • One Night In Miami (Regina King, 2020): A fictional account of one incredible night where icons Muhammad Ali, Malcolm X, Sam Cooke, and Jim Brown gathered discussing their roles in the Civil Rights Movement and cultural upheaval of the 60s.

Documenting Black Life & Struggle

These documentaries are powerful examples of the camera as a witness of both political and personal history.

  • The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (Göran Hugo Olsson, 2011): Footage shot by a group of Swedish journalists documenting the Black Power Movement.
  • Whose Streets? (Sabaah Folayan, Damon Davis, 2017): An unflinching look at how the police killing of 18-year-old Mike Brown inspired a community to fight back and sparked a global movement.
  • I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck, 2016): Writer James Baldwin tells the story of race in modern America with his unfinished novel, Remember This House.
  • Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, 2019): This artful and intimate meditation on the legendary storyteller examines her life, her works and the powerful themes she has confronted throughout her literary career.
  • Time (Garrett Bradley, 2020): Fox Rich fights for the release of her husband, Rob, who is serving a 60-year sentence in prison.
  • John Lewis: Good Trouble (Dawn Porter, 2020): The film explores Georgia representative’s, 60-plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health care reform, and immigration.
  • 13th (Ava Duvernay, 2016): An in-depth look at the prison system in the United States and how it reveals the nation’s history of racial inequality.
  • 16 Shots (Rick Rowley, 2019): A documentary examining the 2014 shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke and the cover-up that ensued.

Must-see Indies

Black independent cinema continues to soar in the 21st century. Our selection highlights the most innovative voices coming out in the last ten years.

  • Moonlight (Barry Jenkins, 2016): A young African-American man grapples with his identity and sexuality while experiencing the everyday struggles of childhood, adolescence, and burgeoning adulthood.
  • Small Axe (Steve McQueen, 2020): A 5-part mini-series, Small Axe is based on the real-life experiences of London’s West Indian community and is set between 1969 and 1982.
  • Queen & Slim (Melina Matsoukas, 2019): A couple’s first date takes an unexpected turn when a police officer pulls them over.
  • Fruitvale Station (Ryan Cooglar, 2013): The story of Oscar Grant III, a 22-year-old Bay Area resident, who crosses paths with friends, enemies, family, and strangers on the last day of 2008.
  • Sorry to Bother You (Boots Riley, 2018): In an alternate present-day version of Oakland, telemarketer Cassius Green discovers a magical key to professional success, propelling him into a universe of greed.
  • Miss Juneteenth (Channing Godfrey Peoples, 2020): A former beauty queen and single mom prepares her rebellious teenage daughter for the “Miss Juneteenth” pageant.
  • Mudbound (Dee Rees, 2017): Two men return home from World War II to work on a farm in rural Mississippi, where they struggle to deal with racism and adjusting to life after war.

Meet Peter Wild Crea, Rehabilitation Aide at Athletico

The Health Care & Science (HCS) Career Community wants to introduce students to a wide range of careers from popular clinical roles (e.g., nurse, physician, veterinarian) to jobs like healthcare data analytics, health administration, or biotech research.  

Today, we want to highlight a fantastic job seen on the resumes of numerous DePaul students: Rehabilitation Assistant or Aide at Athletico. In a recent virtual interview, Debbie Kaltman (HCS Employer Engagement Specialist) met with Peter Wild Crea (DePaul ‘22, Health Sciences) to discuss his educational experiences, career journey, and insights for students interested in clinical health professions. 

As a current pre-med student at DePaul, Peter’s passion for health and patient care allowed him to explore many opportunities on and off campus. Shadowing a physical therapist at Athletico led to a job as a Rehabilitation Aide in which Peter has a wide range of responsibilities, including patient support, sanitation, and administrative work. Through this role, Peter builds close relationships with patients, learns about the human body and healthcare systems, and gains valuable clinical experience. Additionally, Peter continues to create opportunities for himself and develop his skills as a Peer Health Educator and student organization leader in order to prepare for a future in medical school.

A valuable token of advice from Peter for fellow students: “Lead with your passion, but also allow your passions to change.”

Check out the full video below to learn more!

Check out employment opportunities at Athletico here.

Meet Mai Hong, Senior Operations Program Manager at Teladoc Health

Here at the Health Care & Science Career Community, we want to introduce students to a wide range of careers in those industries. Students may be familiar with popular clinical roles (nurse, physician, veterinarian), but not with jobs like healthcare data analytics or administration, or biotech research.  

Livongo & Teladoc Health (a recently merged company) is “transforming the healthcare experience and empowering people everywhere to live healthier lives.”  Teladoc is a leader in telehealth, or virtual healthcare, providing virtual primary health care, mental health and chronic care management (including diabetes, high blood pressure and weight loss).    

Mai Hong is Senior Operations Program Manager at Teladoc, and recently offered her advice to current students interested in careers in healthcare startups, as well as health administration & management and health data, analytics and informatics (learn more about these industries here!)

Q: Can you explain what your job is? What do you do on a daily/weekly basis?
A: I’m a Senior Operations Program Manager. On a daily basis, I work with our eligibility department to make sure that we’re enrolling members. On a weekly basis, I work cross-functionally with other teams to set up clients and figure out how to scale operations as our company grows.

Q: What do you find most rewarding about your job? 
A: We’re a young company so everything we do is figuring out: how are we as a company going to do this? It’s a lot of fun to create things from scratch. There are no playbooks so we can be really creative and innovative about how we approach things

Q: What do you find most challenging? 
A: We’re growing very quickly so the other part of my job is to build things out that are scalable. So what we build today that works when we have 100 members, will it work tomorrow when we have 1000 members?

Q: Looking back, what were your most meaningful experiences from undergrad/grad school? (Internships, jobs, classes, student organizations, etc) 
A: I participated in hackathons during grad school and it made me realize I love working in fast paced environments that come up with out-of-the-box solutions. It also helped me understand how to put together pitches that would appeal to stakeholders.

Q: What advice do you have for students looking to enter biotech/health tech/health startup worlds? 
A: Ask a lot of questions! Health startups move quickly so there’s a lot of value in people that can get up to speed quickly and ask critical questions. 

Interested in learning more? Check out careers at Teladoc and careers at Livongo.  Learn more about careers in health care and science here!

DePaul Career Center February Programming

We are excited to share our February 2021 programming schedule below! These regularly scheduled virtual events and workshops will help you stay on top of your career goals, gain new skills and navigate the ever-changing job market.

Our career advisors are also available remotely for one-on-one appointments and tailored advice.


Feb 2Summer Internship Fest: Tips for Searching & Succeeding

Feb 5: Informational Interview Day with the Alumni Sharing Knowledge Program


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Feb 4Introduction to Survey Design

Feb 10: Negotiation & Salary Negotiation

Feb 18: Grant Writing

Feb 19: Introduction to Content Marketing

Feb 26: Product Management Basics

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Feb 9: Health Care & Science Community Pop-Up: Kahoot Trivia Night

Feb 10: Industry Insights: Careers in Data Analytics

Feb 17: How I Got This Job in HR

Feb 18: Tech & Design Community Pop-Up: Twitch Night with Industry Pros

Feb 22: ASK Oasis Pre-Career Fair Event: Tips for Successful Virtual Engagement

Feb 23: Industry Insights: Careers in Local Government

Feb 23: Resumes for Designers

Feb 23: Alumni MasterClass: Finding & Maintaining a Work / Life Balance

Industry Insights: Careers in Museums Recap

On Thursday, November 5, the Education, Nonprofit & Government Career Community at DePaul hosted a panel discussion with current professionals in the museum industry to speak about their roles and experiences working in museums. The panelists shared their journeys of how they ended up in this industry and provided some insights for students on how to break into the field. 

Panelists were asked questions around different themes, including overviews of their roles, recommended hard and soft skills to have for this industry, advice for students and alumni to break into the museum industry, and more. 

Our volunteer panelists included:

  • Madeline Shearer, Assistant Director of Institutional Relations at the Art Institute of Chicago
  • Lorien Yonker, Curatorial Associate for the Arts of Africa and Arts of the Ancient Mediterranean and Byzantium at the Art Institute of Chicago
  • Molly Butler, Marketing Coordinator at the Field Museum
  • Catherine Anchin, Acting Associate Director for Advancement and External Affairs at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art in Washington, DC

How One of the Panelists Started Her Museum Journey

“When I was a senior in undergrad, I started reaching out to museum professionals whether on LinkedIn or email and just saying, “Hi I’m a student and I’m really interested in your job, do you mind chatting with me for half an hour?” That way you start to really build a network, because museum jobs are few and far between, especially now. The more relationships you have and connections you build can really give you a leg up when those decisions open up.”

Interested in setting up an informational interview? Check out this resource in our career library!

Important Advice for Succeeding and Advancing in Museum Roles

“Be prepared to advocate for yourself. In my experience, our work is quite a bit more fast paced than people imagine and we’re on from one project to the next continually. So, if you do get your foot in the door and want to advance, you really have to get comfortable putting yourself out there and advocating for yourself. I know that doesn’t always come naturally to people, myself included, so it’s something I really had to work at and practice in other areas of my life. That really served me well in advancing to the kind of position I was hoping to get.”

Check out the full recording of the event below!

Here, We Do: Students of Internship Plus (FQ 2020)

We know that not every student can afford to take an unpaid internship. The Internship Plus Program addresses the issue by awarding up to $2,500 in financial assistance to students who have an unpaid internship opportunity and demonstrate financial need.

Through this program, many students are able to gain important experience in their field of interest. Here is what some of them had to say.

Kathia interned at Dim Events

Kathia Hernandez

My internship has helped me in learning what I want to pursue in the future. I can participate in many of my extracurricular activities because of scholarships like these. By having more time to focus on what I want to build in my community and by helping others through service I can further my passions.

It has been a great 6 months working as an intern at Dim Events, and it really encouraged me to start planning out my own business plan.

I have learned a lot about building a community virtually and campaigning for things that I am passionate about such as, women empowerment, Black Lives Matter, and Latinx community issues. I have also moved up in my internship, from being an entrepreneurship intern to becoming an intern manager.


Theodora interned at The Creative Process

Tea’s profile page on The Creative Process website

The experience I had working for The Creative Process opened doors to a plethora of creative media opportunities—it’s become a bridge into a rich realm of marketable skills and experiences.

As an associate podcast producer and interviewer, my tasks revolved around listening, editing, and providing insight on interviews, with the end goal of conducting an interview myself. If it weren’t for my Internship Plus award, I would not have been able to accomplish as much as I had, considering I would’ve spent more time working in order to save for tuition and loans.

My internship experience has encouraged me to explore opportunities in media and content creation, in addition to podcasting and journalism.

Navigating the waters of such a wide-ranging realm of creative freedom has given me a unique opportunity to make an impact with artists and students on an international scale by advocating for the immersion of the creative arts in our daily lives.


Aashka interned at Trouvaiz

Trouvaiz’s Instagram page that Aashka managed

Being in the Marketing Honors program along with taking two other classes and taking on an internship was a challenge. It was very helpful doing an internship that gave me the freedom to take the marketing strategy the way I preferred.

This pandemic has put a financial strain on everyone, the Internship Plus Award scholarship was a huge help in lifting of that financial stress off of my shoulders. It allowed me to take on this internship which has greatly expanded my skills in social media marketing.

I have more confidence in my major and have a better idea of what i would like to do job wise for someone who is graduating next year.

COVID has rendered all financially fragile at the moment as jobs are hard to find and internships are not willing to pay. Getting closer to graduation you realize that you won’t have these opportunities of financial support while obtaining actual skills in your career. I would like to thank this program for giving me the opportunity to take on this internship especially in such a prime time as I am graduating next year.


Justin interned at Joel Hall Dancers & Center

I started a marketing and media internship with Joel Hall Dancers & Center at the beginning of the Fall 2020 semester. For 46+ years, Joel Hall has established a black-led non-profit organization that has focused on being an inclusive and diverse art incubation center. My job was to help them celebrate their rich jazz history, sharing Joel’s story via social media outlets, video editing, and digital marketing campaigns.

The internship and the Internship Plus award allowed me to use my knowledge to assist local art communities thrive.

My main goal with my digital marketing degree is to help local Chicago organizations create a professional online presence and build digital media content that reflects their identity. I believe through this Internship Plus Program, I was able to represent DePaul University and put our mission into action. Since DePaul is proudly a Chicago institution, it felt great working as an extension of DePaul to build off of what other great, local businesses Chicago has to offer.

Applications for the Spring Internship Plus program are now open. Apply on the Scholarship Connect by February 28th, 2021.