DePaul Career Center Remote Resources

We know the world can seem like an overwhelming place at the moment. We are here to help. Schedule an appointment to meet with us virtually and check out the resources included below.


Career Advising Appointments

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Career advising appointments are still available and currently being held virtually via phone or Zoom. Schedule an appointment to review your resume, discuss your career pathways, prepare for an interview and more!

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Zoom Drop-In Coaching

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Mon: 9:00am -5:30pm, T/W/Th: 9:00am-7:00pm,
F: 9:00am-5:00pm, Sun: 12:00-4:00pm
Our Peer Career Coaches are now offering drop-in coaching sessions for DePaul students and alumni. Peers can review your resume or cover letter, provide general career guidance, and answer questions about Handshake, LinkedIn and other Career Center resources.

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Searching for a job or internship?

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Handshake is our career platform and employers are posting there every day! 80% of students with updated profiles get contacted by recruiters.

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Career Resource Library
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Check out our library of over 50 handouts on a wide variety of career topics, ranging from preparing for a video interview to tailoring your resume and cover letter for a specific role. Our most popular handout is Resume Basics!

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Website Chat
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Have a quick question about how to make an appointment? Need help locating a resource? We’re available to chat on our website Monday – Friday from 9am – 5pm.

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Alumni Sharing Knowledge (ASK)

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Social distancing doesn’t mean disconnecting! Search for and connect with over 1,500 alumni volunteers for career, academic and life advice on the DePaul ASK network.

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DePaul Career Center March Programming

We are excited to share our March 2021 programming schedule below! These regularly scheduled virtual events and workshops will help you stay on top of your career goals, gain new skills and navigate the ever-changing job market.

Our career advisors are also available remotely for one-on-one appointments and tailored advice.


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Mar 5Skills Lab: Design Thinking Basics

Mar 11: Skills Lab: Agile Project Management (Not Just for Software Developers)


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Mar 2: Interviewing 101



Mar 3: How I Got This Job: Paramount Pictures

Mar 4: How I Got This Job: UX Design


Mar 4: BEC Community Pop-up : Game Night Edition

Mar 18: ENPG Trivia pop-up


Mar 3: Honors Students: Exploring Careers in Social Sciences and Humanities

Mar 3: Bringing Diversity to the Workplace

Mar 3: Industry Insights: Non-Clinical Hospital Careers with Rush

Mar 3: Just ASK Dialogue Series: Latinx Identity and Influence on Career Journey

Mar 4: Nursing Resume Workshop

Mar 9: Alumni Masterclass: Using Your Strengths at Work

How to Prepare Questions for the Winter Career Fair, With Examples

Tips for developing questions that will help you learn more about employers.

Guidance Provided By: The Handshake Team

Attending DePaul’s upcoming virtual Winter Career Fair (Feb 24) on Handshake will help you get an internship or job as employers focus on hiring students virtually. Virtual career fairs sessions are a great opportunity for you to connect with and learn more about the organizations hiring DePaul students. But how can you stand out to employers and make a great impression? One way is by showing up prepared and having thoughtful questions to ask. Here are some tips for prepping questions, and some examples to help get you started.

Learn about the employer

The first step is to do some research on the employer. Start by reading through their Handshake page, where you’ll get an overview of the organization, see student reviews, and check out the open jobs and internships. Then go through their company website and do an online search for recent news articles, press releases and other relevant information. 

Spending some time before the session to learn more will pay off because it shows the employer your interest in their organization and in getting a job. It’ll also keep you from asking something that is easily found on their Handshake page or website. If you go the extra mile and demonstrate that you’re informed, the employer ambassador will definitely be impressed!

Create a list of questions

Now that you have more information, you can start writing your list of questions. Take time to think about what interests you the most about this employer. What do you want to learn more about? What qualities are important to you in a potential employer? What will help you decide if they are a good fit for you? 

Make a list of your priorities and then fill in questions for each. It’s a good idea to have several questions for each session, in case some are answered by the employer before you have a chance to ask them.

When to ask a question

There are group and one-on-one sessions during virtual career fairs. If you’re attending a group session, make sure to wait for the host to announce that it’s time for questions. Depending on the session, you may have an opportunity to ask your question on video or type it into the chat. One-on-one sessions are an open conversation with the employer, so you should feel free to ask questions as you go. 

Examples of questions

Here are a few examples of questions you can ask during virtual sessions. These are inspiration to help you get started. It’s important to tailor your questions depending on the type of session and your unique interests. 

General employer questions

  • How would you describe the culture of the organization?
  • What is the office environment like? Is it formal or more casual?
  • How does leadership promote diversity and inclusion within the organization? 
  • What support, initiatives, and/or training around diversity and inclusion are available to employees (i.e. employee resource groups, mentorship programs, leadership development)?
  • Are there professional development opportunities?
  • Does the organization encourage employees to pursue advanced degrees? 

Questions about a specific team or job

  • What does success look like in this role? On this team?
  • How would you describe this team? The manager?
  • What are the opportunities for growth in this role? On this team?
  • Do managers encourage innovation and creativity? 
  • How do managers measure success for employees/interns?

Questions for one-on-one sessions

  • What do you like most about working for [employer]?
  • Do you participate in employee resource/social groups?
  • What other teams do you work closely with?
  • What is the best part of your job?
For more tips, check out our guide to attending virtual career fairs.

#BlackHistoryMonth Movie Night

This year, we are celebrating Black History Month by recognizing the immense contribution of Black filmmakers and actors to the silver screen. So grab your popcorn and start streaming!

Cornerstones of Black Cinema

From the grit of everyday characters to the poetic images that continue to influence, here are some of the pivotal pieces that define Black cinema.

From top left to bottom right:

  • Do The Right Thing (Spike Lee, 1989): On the hottest day of the year on a street in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, everyone’s hate and bigotry smolders and builds until it explodes into violence.
  • Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash, 1991): Languid look at the Gullah culture of the sea islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia where African folk-ways were maintained well into the 20th Century and was one of the last bastion of these mores in America.
  • Eve’s Bayou (Kasi Lemmons, 1997): Husband, father and womanizer Louis Batiste is the head of an affluent family, but it’s the women who rule this gothic world of secrets, lies and mystic forces.
  • Get Out (Jordan Peele, 2017): A young African-American visits his white girlfriend’s parents for the weekend, where his simmering uneasiness about their reception of him eventually reaches a boiling point.
  • Killer of Sheep (Charles Burnett, 1978): Set in the Watts area of Los Angeles, a slaughterhouse worker must suspend his emotions to continue working at a job he finds repugnant, and then he finds he has little sensitivity for the family he works so hard to support.
  • Boyz n’ The Hood (John Singleton, 1991): Follows the lives of three young males living in the Crenshaw ghetto of Los Angeles, dissecting questions of race, relationships, violence, and future prospects.

Iconic Black Performances

Some roles get to be defined by the actors that portray them. Here are some unforgettable performances that showcase the epitome of cinematic acting.

  • Viola Davis in Fences (2016)
  • Chadwick Boseman in Black Panther (2018)
  • Whoopi Goldberg in The Color Purple (1985)
  • Lupita Nyong’o in 12 Years a Slave (2013)
  • Angela Bassett in What’s Love Got to Do with It (1993)
  • Morgan Freeman in Invictus (2009)
  • Denzel Washington in Malcolm X (1992)
  • Michael B. Jordan in Just Mercy (2019)
  • Danny Glover in To Sleep with Anger (1991)

Black History through Movies

Films can bring to life stories of historical struggle and brilliance in a way that simultaneously captures and educates the audience. These movies depict some of the heroes that marked Black History.

  • Hidden Figures (Theodore Melfi, 2016): The story of a team of female African-American mathematicians who served a vital role in NASA during the early years of the U.S. space program.
  • Harriet (Kasi Lemmons, 2019): The extraordinary tale of Harriet Tubman’s escape from slavery and transformation into one of America’s greatest heroes, whose courage, ingenuity, and tenacity freed hundreds of slaves and changed the course of history.
  • Judas & The Black Messiah (Shaka King, 2021): Bill O’Neal infiltrates the Black Panther Party per FBI Agent Mitchell and J. Edgar Hoover. As Party Chairman Fred Hampton ascends, falling for a fellow revolutionary en route, a battle wages for O’Neal’s soul.
  • Selma (Ava DuVernay, 2014): A chronicle of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s campaign to secure equal voting rights via an epic march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965.
  • One Night In Miami (Regina King, 2020): A fictional account of one incredible night where icons Muhammad Ali, Malcolm X, Sam Cooke, and Jim Brown gathered discussing their roles in the Civil Rights Movement and cultural upheaval of the 60s.

Documenting Black Life & Struggle

These documentaries are powerful examples of the camera as a witness of both political and personal history.

  • The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (Göran Hugo Olsson, 2011): Footage shot by a group of Swedish journalists documenting the Black Power Movement.
  • Whose Streets? (Sabaah Folayan, Damon Davis, 2017): An unflinching look at how the police killing of 18-year-old Mike Brown inspired a community to fight back and sparked a global movement.
  • I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck, 2016): Writer James Baldwin tells the story of race in modern America with his unfinished novel, Remember This House.
  • Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, 2019): This artful and intimate meditation on the legendary storyteller examines her life, her works and the powerful themes she has confronted throughout her literary career.
  • Time (Garrett Bradley, 2020): Fox Rich fights for the release of her husband, Rob, who is serving a 60-year sentence in prison.
  • John Lewis: Good Trouble (Dawn Porter, 2020): The film explores Georgia representative’s, 60-plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health care reform, and immigration.
  • 13th (Ava Duvernay, 2016): An in-depth look at the prison system in the United States and how it reveals the nation’s history of racial inequality.
  • 16 Shots (Rick Rowley, 2019): A documentary examining the 2014 shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke and the cover-up that ensued.

Must-see Indies

Black independent cinema continues to soar in the 21st century. Our selection highlights the most innovative voices coming out in the last ten years.

  • Moonlight (Barry Jenkins, 2016): A young African-American man grapples with his identity and sexuality while experiencing the everyday struggles of childhood, adolescence, and burgeoning adulthood.
  • Small Axe (Steve McQueen, 2020): A 5-part mini-series, Small Axe is based on the real-life experiences of London’s West Indian community and is set between 1969 and 1982.
  • Queen & Slim (Melina Matsoukas, 2019): A couple’s first date takes an unexpected turn when a police officer pulls them over.
  • Fruitvale Station (Ryan Cooglar, 2013): The story of Oscar Grant III, a 22-year-old Bay Area resident, who crosses paths with friends, enemies, family, and strangers on the last day of 2008.
  • Sorry to Bother You (Boots Riley, 2018): In an alternate present-day version of Oakland, telemarketer Cassius Green discovers a magical key to professional success, propelling him into a universe of greed.
  • Miss Juneteenth (Channing Godfrey Peoples, 2020): A former beauty queen and single mom prepares her rebellious teenage daughter for the “Miss Juneteenth” pageant.
  • Mudbound (Dee Rees, 2017): Two men return home from World War II to work on a farm in rural Mississippi, where they struggle to deal with racism and adjusting to life after war.

How to Prepare Your Virtual Career Fair “Elevator Pitch”

Learn how to create the perfect elevator pitch ahead of your next career fair – with examples!

Guidance Provided By: The Handshake Team

So, you’ve registered for the DePaul Winter virtual career fair. You’ve scoped out the attending employers, registered for a few group and 1:1 sessions, and you’re feeling excited about the connections you’re about to make. You’ve got your outfit picked out, you’ve chatted with your roommates about keeping quiet and avoiding distractions during the fair, and you’re hopeful that you’ll make a good impression and find the job or internship you’re dreaming about. So, what else can you do to prepare? It’s time to work on your elevator pitch.

One of the best things you can do ahead of any virtual event is to prepare a few talking points to succinctly make the case about why you’re a great candidate. The employers that you meet with want to learn more about you! So think of a short overview about your background, studies, and career goals. Practice with a friend or family member ahead of the virtual fair so you’re ready when it’s time to introduce yourself to a recruiter.

Ahead, read our tips for how to prepare an elevator pitch.

What is an elevator pitch?

An elevator pitch is essentially a short and sweet synopsis about yourself for a prospective employer. It’s called an elevator pitch because it’s meant to be brief enough to deliver convincingly during a quick elevator ride to your floor.

How long should my pitch be?

Think about the length of your average elevator ride. Not long, right? It’s a best practice to keep your elevator pitch to a minute or less! The key to an impactful elevator pitch is to stay short and sweet, avoid rambling, and prioritize truly pertinent information.

What should I include in my elevator pitch?

Focus on the skills and qualifications that’ll make you uniquely appealing to your audience. Give some top-level bullet points about what makes you an awesome candidate! 

  • Your field of study
  • A couple relevant skills or certifications
  • A nod to relevant experience 

Your elevator pitch should also touch on your professional goals: if you hope to find a job at a mission-driven startup, or want to relocate to Denver, or aim for a role where you’ll flex your coding skills, mention these. 

If you plan to meet with a few different types of employers during your career fair, don’t be afraid to tailor your pitch to different industries and roles. For example, your proficiency in Photoshop might not be relevant to a corporate sales role, but it is for marketing! Be aware of your audience. 

How to deliver an elevator pitch

When it comes to your elevator pitch, practice makes perfect. You might feel silly running through a 30-second spiel about yourself, but becoming confident in your delivery can make a huge difference when you’re face-to-face with a recruiter! Aim for your pitch to be brief, persuasive, and confident—not boastful. Ask a trusted friend or family member to run through your pitch with you a few times, give constructive feedback, and help you nail it! 

How should I wrap up after my pitch?

Typically, it’s a best practice to have a business card or a copy of your resume to hand to somebody after delivering your IRL elevator pitch during a career fair. However, since you’ll be meeting recruiters during virtual fairs, have a link to your Handshake profile handy to send via chat! If relevant, you can also share a digital portfolio during this time.

Elevator pitch examples:

  • “I’m Brinton and I just graduated DePaul University with a degree in English! I’ve worked as a freelance writer for lifestyle publications like Bustle for the past two years, and now I’m looking to grow as a full-time reporter in the entertainment, travel, or breaking news space. I’m proficient in Photoshop, certified in Google Analytics, and have experience managing social media channels for small businesses.”
  • “I’m Luke, and I’m a software engineer with a background working with high-growth e-commerce startups in the Chicago area. However, now I am looking for an opportunity that will bring me closer to my family and friends in Raleigh. I specialize in iOS and have four years of experience writing C++ code in a POSIX environment.”
  • “I’m Rey, and I’m a rising senior at DePaul University. I’m studying finance and spent last summer as an analyst for Goldman Sachs, where I focused mainly on comparative financial performance analysis. Now that I’m graduating in June, I’m hoping to find a full-time role as an investment banking analyst.”

Meet Peter Wild Crea, Rehabilitation Aide at Athletico

The Health Care & Science (HCS) Career Community wants to introduce students to a wide range of careers from popular clinical roles (e.g., nurse, physician, veterinarian) to jobs like healthcare data analytics, health administration, or biotech research.  

Today, we want to highlight a fantastic job seen on the resumes of numerous DePaul students: Rehabilitation Assistant or Aide at Athletico. In a recent virtual interview, Debbie Kaltman (HCS Employer Engagement Specialist) met with Peter Wild Crea (DePaul ‘22, Health Sciences) to discuss his educational experiences, career journey, and insights for students interested in clinical health professions. 

As a current pre-med student at DePaul, Peter’s passion for health and patient care allowed him to explore many opportunities on and off campus. Shadowing a physical therapist at Athletico led to a job as a Rehabilitation Aide in which Peter has a wide range of responsibilities, including patient support, sanitation, and administrative work. Through this role, Peter builds close relationships with patients, learns about the human body and healthcare systems, and gains valuable clinical experience. Additionally, Peter continues to create opportunities for himself and develop his skills as a Peer Health Educator and student organization leader in order to prepare for a future in medical school.

A valuable token of advice from Peter for fellow students: “Lead with your passion, but also allow your passions to change.”

Check out the full video below to learn more!

Check out employment opportunities at Athletico here.

Your 10 Biggest Virtual Career Fair Questions, Answered

Find answers to the most common questions about virtual recruiting events on Handshake.

Guidance Provided By: The Handshake Team

You may have heard that meeting employers at virtual career fairs will help you land a job or internship this year. But we know you also have some questions—from what to wear to what to ask. is coming up in two weeks, so we’ve gathered the ten most commonly asked questions from students and answered them below so that you can be ready for DePaul’s upcoming Virtual Winter Career Fair on Feb 24.

1. What’s the difference between a group session and a one-on-one session?

Group sessions are primarily for employers to share more about their organizations with students. There is usually a Q&A portion where you can ask the employer a question. One-on-one sessions are 10 minute conversations between you and an employer to discuss your background and experience, as well as current job and internship opportunities.

2. Do I need to sign up for sessions before the virtual career fair starts?

Yes! You should start signing up for sessions once you’ve registered for the fair. One of the biggest benefits of attending a virtual career fair is that you can secure your spot with the employers you want to meet. So it’s important to go through the fair schedule and sign up early for the sessions you want.

3. I don’t see any available sessions with the employers I’m interested in. What should I do?

If you don’t see available sessions, it may mean that the employer is in the process of setting up their sessions, or their current sessions are full. Be sure to check back on the fair schedule in the days and hours leading up to the fair to view newly added sessions. You can also connect with your career center and ask if they’re working with employers to open more session times. 

We also suggest having an open mind when deciding which employers to meet during virtual career fairs. Instead of focusing on the brand names you know, go through the full list of employers who are attending and view their Handshake pages to learn more. You may find a great match for you in an unlikely place.

4. Do I need to be on video?

Having your video on during sessions is optional. You may also communicate with employers through audio or chat features. For one-on-one sessions, we recommend turning your video on to help employers make a strong connection with you. 

For group sessions with more than 15 attendees, student video will not be enabled unless you are asking a question. To ask a question during a group session, click the hand icon on your screen to “raise your hand”. The host will be able to call on you and enable your video.

5. What should I wear if I’m on video? Do I need a suit?

You definitely want to dress to impress during virtual career fairs. But you don’t have to have the full head-to-toe ensemble (unless it makes you feel more confident, in which case go for it!)

You’ll want to look professional up top—that could mean wearing a collared shirt, dressy sweater, or similar top. Choose whatever makes you look pulled together and feel your best.

6. How do I share my resume with employers?

The easiest way to share your resume with employers is to upload it to your Handshake profile and make it visible. If you already have a resume, be sure to mark it as visible so that employers can view it. After you attend a virtual career fair, employers will have access to your resume when they download a list of participants from their sessions. 

Learn more about document visibility in this Handshake Help Center article.

For more information on uploading your resume, watch How to Upload a Document.

7. I don’t want to be late. How soon can I join a session?

You will be able to join a session 5 minutes before the scheduled start time.

8. What types of questions should I ask during a session?

Virtual sessions are an opportunity for you to learn about employers and decide which are a good fit for you. Think about what interests you most about the employer you’re meeting with. What do you want to learn more about? Is it company culture? Career growth opportunities? Make a list of your priorities and then fill in questions for each. 

Take a bit of time to research each employer before your sessions. This will help you come up with a list of questions. It will also show the employer that you’re informed and prepared—two qualities they like to see!

Check out their Handshake page for overview of the organization, student reviews, as well as open jobs and internships. Then head to their company website, and do a quick online search for recent news articles, press releases and other relevant information. This may help inspire your list of questions.

You can find more tips for preparing questions and sample questions here.

9. How should I introduce myself during a one-on-one session?

The employers you meet during one-on-one sessions want to learn more about you and see if you’re a good fit for their open jobs or internships. So it’s important to prepare a brief introduction about yourself, including your background, studies, and career goals. Then practice with a friend or family member ahead of the fair so you’re ready.

Find more tips for drafting your “elevator pitch” here.

10. Can I drop out of group sessions early or should I wait for them to end?

If you want to make a good impression with employers, you’ll want to stay for the entire session. You wouldn’t leave a one-on-one session early—so don’t disappear from a group session either. Employers have busy schedules just like you, and they’re taking valuable time to help you get to know their organization. Staying until the end of a session demonstrates that you’re responsible and respectful of their time.

For more tips and advice, check out our guide to attending virtual career fairs or visit the Handshake Help Center.