Here, We Do: Students of Internship Plus (Sp21)

We know that not every student can afford to take an unpaid internship, which influenced our decision to establish the Internship Plus Program. This program awards up to $2,500 in financial assistance to students who have an unpaid internship opportunity and demonstrate financial need. Through this program, many students, like the ones below, have been able to gain important experience in their field of interest. Hear about it from them:

Monica interned at The Borgen Project

The Borgen Project is a nonprofit that specifically focuses on advocacy in the topics of Starvation/ Global Food Security; Newborn, Child and Mother Survival; Access to Clean Water and Sanitation; Food and Aid Reform; and COVID-19 Aid. My position as a Nonprofit Leadership Intern helped me to form skills in relation to fundraising, advocacy, community networking and mobilization, education, and issue messaging.

Without the Internship Plus Award I would not have been able to accept this position, and everything that I have learned in my three months has been so meaningful to me. My experiences with The Borgen Project have helped me to grow and participate in the DePaul Mission.

The Borgen Project sees that with the global power that the US holds, it is important to set an example through policy and legislation. I learned the importance of advocating for others and how to put the goal of ending global poverty into action. I used my voice to lobby with members of Congress and move toward my own personal and career goals of becoming involved in politics. This experience embodied the DePaul Mission because it allowed me to advocate for change.

Tyler interned at Chicago Public Schools

Holistically, this endeavour has been very transformative and informative for me. Not only did I learn more skills to add to my teaching belt, I learned more about myself and how I must move through this profession. As a continued learner and advocate for change, I must continue to place myself in positions that nudge growth and versatility. I reflect on how our ever-changing world is fluid, and I have to adjust my practice with the times to provide a relevant substance that elevates student experience and quality of education. Practicing as an educator means that we grow practical theories through experience, and these guide our practice.  Through practice, we find strategies and techniques that best fit our situation and align with the values we echo to support youth.

By leading with love and kindness, I take pride in building harmonious relationships with youth centered on genuine understanding, trust, and authentic connections. These competencies have been foundational pillars through my experience at DePaul, my student teaching practice at Walter Payton High School and have served to advance their fight to create a more equitable and socially just school climate. 

Katie interned at The Executives’ Club of Chicago

At The Executives’ Club of Chicago, I helped coordinate events for CEOs and COOs, Board Chairmen, and business leaders from all industries. The executives would sit down for each event and discuss social justice issues, corporate social responsibility, real estate development to lessen economic and racial inequality, and innovative trends. All of these events align with DePaul’s mission. I learned from leaders who take action to make the city, and the world better. 

I applied for the Internship Plus award because I sacrificed my job to take on an unpaid internship. It was a difficult decision for me. I had to choose between a steady income and an amazing opportunity for my future. The award helped lessen the financial stress I was under, and I no longer saw the internship as a sacrifice. It became a blessing that I was grateful for.

For the past three years, I’ve wondered how I can do good for others. I’ve wondered what my purpose was and when I would figure it out at DePaul. From my internship, I considered the small ways I can make positive change in Chicago. It starts with listening to others, educating ourselves about inequalities, and being a part of uncomfortable conversations to grow as a society. 

Komal interned with HARLEEN KAUR

Wanting to pursue a career in fashion marketing and management, I was able to get an amazing opportunity by being a PR, Marketing, and Social Media Intern for HARLEEN KAUR. From this internship, I was able to get a proper execution on working with a team and creating email campaigns. As this internship allowed me to get real-world experience, it truly helped me reach my personal goals of building my graphic skills and my creative brainstorming. By allowing myself to be out in a position with hard-working individuals who own a company, I was able to understand the pressure and dedication the team has brought and it allowed me to have the same passion as them.

This internship has allowed me to use the outstanding teachings given by my academic professors and incorporate them into my internship by continuously pushing myself to work hard and learn the true objectives of the amazing opportunity I have been given.

By working with my team and by getting one on one interactions with the CEO of HARLEEN KAUR, I was able to observe and develop a great number of skills, expanding my knowledge of the marketing industry. This helped me get closer to my goals of learning the true objectives of time management and allowed me to contribute to the team in unique ways.

Applications for the Fall Internship Plus program are now open. Apply on the Scholarship Connect by August 22, 2021!

50+ Black-Owned and Led Companies to Follow

Dozens of Black-owned and Black-led companies hire students and recent alumni on Handshake. Follow these companies to discover your next career move.

Guidance Provided By: The Handshake Team

Below is listed 50+ Black-owned or Black-led (Black CEO) companies across diverse industries that have hired students who are on the Handshake network. This list includes Fortune 500 companiesdozens of fast-growing startups, and non-profit leaders. Explore this list, then log into Handshake and search for the companies you’re interested in. Hit “Follow” to receive notifications about upcoming opportunities. You can also reach out to peers on the Handshake network who have worked at these companies for more information.

NameIndustryHeadquarters
Acta Non Verba: Youth Urban Farm ProjectFarming, Ranching and FishingCalifornia
Ariel InvestmentsInvestment / Portfolio ManagementIllinois
Baldwin Richardson Foods Co.CPG – Consumer Packaged GoodsIllinois
BCT PartnersManagement ConsultingNew Jersey
Black Aids InstituteNon-ProfitCalifornia
Black Girls CODENon-ProfitCalifornia
Black Women’s BlueprintNon-ProfitNew York
BlavityJournalism, Media & PublishingCalifornia
Bridgewaters InteriorsManufacturingMichigan
CastleOak Securities, L.P.Investment BankingNew York
Chemico, LLCOther IndustriesMichigan
Citizens Savings BankCommercial Banking & CreditMississippi
Cipher Skin Inc.Other IndustriesColorado
Color of ChangeNon-ProfitCalifornia
Daymond John – The Shark GroupAdvertising, PR & MarketingNew York
Destiny Arts CenterNon-ProfitCalifornia
Diversant, LLCHuman ResourcesCalifornia
Epitec, IncOther IndustriesMichigan
Equal Justice InitiativeNon-ProfitAlabama
Fair Oaks Farms (Wisconsin)Food & BeveragesWisconsin
Girls for a ChangeNon-ProfitVirginia
Global Commerce and ServicesInternet & SoftwareLouisiana
GN BankCommercial Banking & CreditIllinois
Harvey B. Gantt Center for African American Arts + CulturePerforming and Fine ArtsNorth Carolina
JOURNiOther EducationMichigan
KairosNon-ProfitOregon
Loops Capital Markets, LLCInvestment BankingIllinois
Merck & Co., IncPharmaceuticalsNew Jersey
My Brother’s KeeperNon-ProfitMassachusetts
NAACPGovernment – Local, State & FederalMaryland
NAACP LDFNon-ProfitNew York
National Urban LeagueNon-ProfitNew York
Nightlight Pediatric Urgent CareHealthcareTexas
OneUnited BankAdvertising, PR & MarketingMassachussetts
O, The Oprah Magazine (Hearst)Journalism, Media & PublishingNew York
Pharos Capital GroupInvestment / Portfolio ManagementTexas
PindropInternet & SoftwareGeorgia
Rocket LawyerInternet & SoftwareCalifornia, Utah
Siebert Cisneros Shank & Co., LLCInvestment BankingNew York
Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureTourismDistrict of Columbia
Tapestry, Inc.FashionNew York
TaskRabbitInternet & SoftwareCalifornia
The Anderson-DuBose CompanyTransportation & LogisticsOhio
The Essie Justice GroupNon-ProfitCalifornia
The Innocence ProjectNon-ProfitNew York
Thompson Hospitality GroupRestaurants & Food ServicesVirginia
TIAAInvestment / Portfolio ManagementNew York
Uncharted PowerUtilities and RenewablesNew York
Vista Equity PartnersInvestment / Portfolio ManagementTexas
World Wide TechnologyComputer NetworkingMissouri
Zume PizzaRestaurants & Food ServicesCalifornia

How to Get an Internship or Job When Hiring is All Virtual

Learn how to navigate virtual recruitment and stand out to employers online.

Guidance Provided By: The Handshake Team

Recruiting season may look different this year, but luckily thousands of employers are searching for students on Handshake. So, how can you be ready to land your next job or internship virtually this year? Follow these steps to make the most of your online job hunt. 

Complete your Handshake profile

This is always our first piece of advice for student job seekers, because your profile is fundamental to getting hired on Handshake. Employers are searching for students to recruit based on the information in their profiles such as major, graduation date, and interests (job type, cities, roles). And you can highlight all of the things that make you uniquely qualified including your courses, organizations, work experience and skills. When you complete your profile, you’ll be more likely to receive direct messages from employers inviting you to events or to apply for jobs.

The next step is crafting your resume with the information included in your profile. Upload and save your resume to your Handshake account so it’s ready when you’re applying to jobs. You can upload more than one version of your resume—so consider adapting it for different roles that you want to apply for.

Start networking online

You’ve probably heard that networking is important, and it can sound a bit intimidating. But “networking” really just means making a connection with someone from your school, extracurriculars, volunteer groups—or just reaching out to someone you don’t know who shares the same professional interests. There are many different ways to start networking online. 

Find alumni of your school on Handshake who have or had roles that you’re interested in and send them a message. Introduce yourself and tell them you’d like to learn more about their experience. Ask them a question you have about their organization or how they began their career. And don’t forget to thank them in advance for connecting and sharing their advice.

Try looking for online professional interest groups to make connections with people in the fields that you’re exploring. It may take some research; you can also reach out to your professors or club leaders for their suggestions.

Stay up-to date on employers 

When you see an employer on Handshake that you like, click the Follow button on their page. If you’re on the Handshake app, click the star button. Following employers on Handshake is so useful because you’ll receive email alerts when they post new jobs and events. Plus, it helps improve your job recommendations. The more you explore and follow employers you’d like to work for, the more relevant your recommendations become.

Additionally, you can set search engine alerts for your top employers and follow their social media accounts. These are easy ways to learn about new initiatives, jobs, and other notable updates on their organization. 

Attend virtual recruiting events

One of the biggest opportunities to connect with employers this year is at virtual events on Handshake. Employers are hosting group and 1:1 sessions to give students a look at their organizations and to recruit for open jobs and internships. Be sure to check your email for event announcements and log in often to see upcoming events for students at your school. You’ll also be notified when employers you follow are attending virtual fairs on Handshake. 

When you register for a virtual fair, you can sign up early for sessions with the employers you want to meet and learn more about—a major advantage over traditional career fairs. Don’t miss these prime recruiting opportunities! 

Read our guide to virtual events, with tips and tricks to know before you attend.

Practice for virtual interviews

Just like in-person interviews, it takes some practice to get comfortable with virtual interviews. This is the time to call in some reinforcements. Ask a friend or family member to help you practice. Start with your “elevator pitch”—a brief introduction about you, your background and career goals. Then have them ask you a few common interview questions and ask them for any feedback on your answers. While you don’t need to memorize exactly what you’ll say, it’s very important to get more comfortable answering interview questions. 

Check out our post with more ways to impress employers during a virtual interview.

Chat with your career center

Your school’s career center staff are an incredible resource, so take advantage of their knowledge. They can answer your job and internship questions, help you craft your resume and cover letters, or even practice for virtual interviews. They also have insight on employers that are hiring at your school and those that may have strong alumni networks. Call your career center and schedule an appointment—they’ll be happy to help you. 

Apply apply apply

You can’t get a job if you don’t apply, right? It may go without saying, but you’ll greatly increase your chances of getting hired if you apply to a lot of open jobs. And try to keep an open mind, especially if you’re not quite sure what you want to do. Now is the time to gain different experiences and learn what you do and don’t like about a job. 

Luckily Handshake will surface recommendations based on your profile, to help you find the jobs you want to apply for. Once you have your profile filled in and resumes uploaded, you’ll be able to apply to many jobs on Handshake in just a few clicks.

Be proactive and follow up

No matter where your job search takes you, be consistent and follow up. Whether it’s a message from an employer, an application, virtual event or interview—always consider three p’s: be proactive, prompt and polite. For interviews, whether informational or for an open job, it’s best practice to send a thank you note within 24 hours. In your thank you note, share something specific that you enjoyed learning or talking about, and reiterate your interest in the job, career path, etc. 

If you discussed an open job or internship with an employer during a virtual event, make sure to apply as soon as possible. If the employers shared their contact information with you, send them a note thanking them and letting them know you’ve applied.

Your online actions are especially important when recruiting is virtual. If you can’t make a great impression in person, it’s best to be extra responsive and appreciative to the connections you make online. 

Log into Handshake now to get started on your virtual job search!

6 Ways to Make the Most of a Remote Internship

Guidance Provided By: The Handshake Team


If you were to form your idea of an internship based solely on movies and TV, you’d probably picture long hours spent in a skyscraper somewhere, picking up lunch for executives and making copies all day long. Thankfully, the reality of internships isn’t quite so limited: internships can be found virtually everywhere, in any industry, and can be far more hands-on. At Handshake, for example, interns can do everything from push out code on the mobile app to writing articles for the blog!

But what happens when your internship takes place remotely, eliminating the in-office aspects of your program? Whether you originally planned to work from home during your internship or not, there are plenty of ways to maximize your experience as a remote intern to make the best impression and learn the most about your career path.

1. Set boundaries, even if your hours and location are flexible

Because remote internships are often project-based rather than hourly, it can be easy to treat them like homework, squeezing in a few minutes of work here and there between other commitments. For Handshake Social & Editorial Manager Brinton Botkin, setting “office hours” was key to succeeding in her remote internships during college.

“Even though my internships focused more on the finished work I turned in and less on the hours I spent, I still treated it like a regular in-office job,” she says. “I would block off time on my calendar and post up in a coffee shop, the library, or even in my kitchen at home and turn everything else on Do Not Disturb while I worked. Setting aside a dedicated time and space for my internship work helped me ensure that my deadlines were met, I was prompt and communicative with my managers, and that I could balance the rest of my life, too—I wasn’t trying to multitask on my internship responsibilities while at my coffee shop job or in class.”

2. Find time to connect with mentors

In a remote internship, you don’t get the same everyday face-time with colleagues that you might enjoy in an office environment. In order to supplement this, consider requesting a standing video meeting with your manager, or requesting 15-minute “walk and talks” phone calls to get to know people in different functions. It’s common for interns to invite colleagues out for casual coffee chats in traditional office environments, so consider this your chance to accomplish the same thing from afar! You can also connect with peers and other young professionals on Handshake to help build connections within your desired industry and learn about the path ahead.

3. Practice overcommunication

When you don’t have the benefit of physical proximity, it can be hard to feel connected to your management during an internship. Chat with your manager about how best they’d like updates about your work, and make sure to follow through via those channels—if they prefer emails, consider sending a weekly email recap about lessons you’ve learned, projects you’ve made progress on, and any questions that might have arisen during the week. If they prefer face-to-face meetings, come to your video check-ins prepared with notes, questions, and ideas.

4. Ask for feedback

The biggest benefit to any internship is getting real-life experience in the workplace, which can help shape your future plans and mold your skillset to suit your career goals. In order to maximize your remote internship experience, be clear with your manager that you desire feedback so that you can continue to grow as a professional. This might mean hopping on a quick call to review changes they’ve made to a project draft you delivered, or using suggestions and comments in a Google Sheet.

When soliciting feedback from colleagues, it’s key to accept said feedback graciously; think of critique as a favor, because it will help you improve your work. The lessons you take away from your internship will follow you into your first full-time job in your desired field, so capture every bit of advice you can!

5. Document your achievements

Whether you spend a month in your role or chug away for a whole semester, the time often flies by—and so can your projects. If you keep a record of major focus areas and accomplishments over the course of your internship, you can look back and reflect on your growth at the conclusion of your internship. This can benefit both you and your manager; a robust list of tangible achievements can help them quantify the benefit of their organization’s internship program, and you can use the same log to update your resume, fill your portfolio, and inform special skills for your Handshake profile.

6. Ask for a letter of recommendation

A persuasive professional endorsement from a past internship can prove extremely useful when applying for full-time work after graduation. Simply use this guide when asking for a letter of recommendation or to use your manager as a future professional reference.

There’s no reason why working remotely during your internship should hold you back from any of the advantages of a traditional work environment. With the right attitude, you can find many ways to make a great impression on your colleagues, forge lasting connections with peers, and take valuable lessons away from your experience.

Want more internship guidance? For additional insights into the world of internships, check out our intern content series and read real lessons from students who’ve been in your shoes.