Communication & Media Degree: Career Possibilities for Every Interest

By: Brittany Wierman, DePaul University communication & media major ‘20

Few things are as frustrating to a communication and media student as being asked the ultimate, inescapable question, “what job are you going to get with your major?” Some students have their career goals cemented, but for those of us who are still unsure of how our major will lead us down the path of success, have no fear—the communication and media program is equipped to prepare you for a career in whatever niche fuels you.

So what exactly does a major in communication and media look like? Michael Elias, career advisor for the College of Communication explains, “the major itself was designed so students could experience classes across the entire curriculum in the College of Communication.” Essentially, students in this major can explore all different types of communication avenues including film, journalism, public relations, advertising, broadcasting and more to discover which field suits them best.

…Michael suggests that students reflect on their personal interests and skills to narrow down possible career paths.

Since the field of communication is so broad, Michael suggests that students reflect on their personal interests and skills to narrow down possible career paths. As a communication and media major, you can consider seeking career paths as a reporter, press agent, communication coordinator, event planner, human resources manager, and even a disc jockey, all depending on what peaks your interest.

The possibilities are expansive, which means taking different courses to help you uncover your interests and choose a concentration is key. Even if you have a hard time choosing just one specialization, don’t fret; at the end of the day the development of good communication skills through this program will benefit you in your future professional life. Michael elaborates, “[communication] is the foundation of how we relate with one another… it’s what makes us who we are, the ability to express ourselves.” In other words, whether you’re in an interpersonal, intercultural, mass media, or professional setting, the ability to communicate effectively is fundamental to your success.

For more information on specific career paths, major advising and career planning, check out these major and career guides, and stop by the Career Center to connect with your career advisor.

DePaul Diaries: Life in the Startup World, as an Intern

By: Sydney Sewell, DePaul University relational and organizational communication major ’17

DePaul Diaries is a day-in-the-life blog series written by DePaul students. The series unveils DePaulians’ experiences as interns in their field of choice. Students share their honest thoughts about their experiences, what they learned as an intern and advice for students who are interested in the same field.


Picture this: you had your first human resources internship in a corporate environment. You had your own desk, there was a kitchen with a myriad of snacks that accommodated everyone’s dietary restrictions, and you had a career advisor. Sadly, your internship term has ended, but as an eager college student wanting to explore various work environments, you decide to take on the startup world.

From corporate to startup, I can truly say I received the best of both worlds. During the fall of 2016, I had the privilege of interning at a startup digital marketing company as a human resources intern. Before going into this role, I had no clue what I was getting myself into aside from what was listed in the job description and what was stated to me during the two-part interview process. Needless to say, I was in for an eye-opening and completely different experience from what I was accustomed to in the corporate world.

Eye-opening experience number one: The environment

On my first day I was introduced to the coffee shop; the coffee shop was where the company temporarily worked out of while waiting for a permanent space. Therefore, for the four days out of the week that I would come into the “office,” I was welcomed by the fresh smell of grounded coffee beans and the whistling sound of the door continuously opening and closing. Let me start off by saying that I was not use to this.

Eye-opening experience number two: The depth of the job

Upon starting my internship, I was expecting some type of formal training to assist me with getting acclimated with the company and their human resources department. Their idea of training was showing me the various platforms they use for personnel folders and recruiting. Once I understood their platforms, the human resources manager entrusted me with their talent management and training/on-boarding procedures. Again, I was not use to this either. I was only an intern yet they trusted me with creating and implementing company-wide procedures.

Both of my eye-opening experiences are not to deter students from startup companies, but rather shed light on what might be expected out of a startup that is literally establishing itself from the ground-up.

In fact, I have taken away some vital things. First, I can truly say I have had meaningful conversations with individuals in the coffee shop that might not have happened if we were in an office space. This goes to show that your workplace environment and atmosphere truly do matter. Second, the most meaningful experiences came from the human resources manager and the CEO of the company giving me full autonomy over projects. And, as I had more time with the company, I later learned this was the CEO’s goal; he would always state, “My goal with this company is to give student workers [interns] ownership of various projects in order for them to see and reach their fullest potential.” Being able to detail my role for these major projects in my portfolio helped me score other internships as well.

…The most meaningful experiences came from the HR manager and the CEO of the company giving me full autonomy over projects.

I’m positive I am not the only student who has had a corporate to startup experience, or, maybe you had the opposite. Regardless, take these pivotal moments in your life for what they are. See past what may seem as a negative, and envision the best outcome; you never know what can come out of it. So, from this day forward, ask yourself, what environment will you tackle next? You never know what it can bring!

DePaul Diaries: Life as a RefugeeOne Intern

By: Renee Radzom, DePaul University graduate, former University Internship Program (UIP) assistant

DePaul Diaries is a day-in-the-life blog series written by DePaul students. The series unveils DePaulians’ experiences as interns in their field of choice. Students share their honest thoughts about their experiences, what they learned as an intern and advice for students who are interested in the same field.


Alysa Punjwani, international studies major, is spending her winter quarter tackling classes, an on-campus job, and her HR internship at RefugeeOne.

As an HR intern, Alysa said her main responsibilities are redesigning information pamphlets and updating employee handbooks; however, she said her projects change rapidly to fit the needs of the company and she often gets the chance to meet with clients and work with the care managers. Her favorite part of her internship is her “exposure to many different cultures and languages.”

The major skills Alysa is focusing on right now are her language skills and adaptability, as she is constantly on the move and because every day could bring in a new project or client. Alysa is embracing this as she works with a full office of many care managers and other staff members.

On top of her internship, Alysa is balancing her academics and her on-campus positon as a peer career advisor in the Career Center. One of the courses on her plate this quarter is UIP 250: You, Your Work, and the World, which is helping her figure out her transferrable skills and how to get the most of her internship experience. Alysa especially likes that the UIP 250 course is helping her figure out how to create an online portfolio and make an online presence for herself.

However, it’s not always easy to balance work, an internship, and a full course load. Alysa said it can be difficult at times, but, “a clear schedule and understanding supervisors made it easier.” She explained, “many times if there is an academic conflict, I can speak to my supervisors and they’re very understanding of the situation.” Alysa stressed that open communication is key to making it work.

Overall, Alysa is enjoying her quarter working at a large, non-profit and is especially thankful for the scholarship provided by the Internship Plu$ Program to help make it work for her. Her biggest piece of advice to future interns is: “Be flexible with the work you’re assigned and be confident in yourself and the skills and talents you bring to the table.”


Want to learn about DePaul’s University Internship Program? Check it out, here, or send inquiries to UIP@depaul.edu. Need help finding an internship? Visit depaul.joinhandshake.com, or come into DePaul’s Career Center to meet with an advisor.