Meet Juliann Krupa, Coordinator of Guest Engagement & Learning Programs Specialist at John G. Shedd Aquarium

The Health Care & Science (HCS) Career Community wants to introduce students to a wide range of careers. Students may be familiar with popular clinical roles (e.g., nurse, physician, veterinarian), but less familiar with jobs like healthcare data analytics, health administration, or biotech research.  

Juliann Krupa - Learning Programs Specialist - John G. Shedd Aquarium |  LinkedIn

Today, we want to highlight a science educator at Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium. In a virtual interview, Debbie Kaltman (HCS Employer Engagement Specialist) met with Juliann Krupa (DePaul ‘20, MS in Science Education) to share her educational and career journey, her current role as a Learning Programs Specialist, and advice for students interested in science education.

Juliann had many experiences in the museum industry to gain knowledge of animal care and conservation work. Through these opportunities, she discovered her passion for interacting with learners of all ages. As an informal educator, Juliann designs and implements different projects and programs for the aquarium and interacts with new guests of all ages and backgrounds.  She finds teaching and learning from museum guests to be very rewarding. 

Juliann shared her insights on informal education: “Being in informal education is a great way to test out if you would like to teach. If you’re not necessarily interested in teaching in the formal classroom, there are all kinds of opportunities at museums, forest preserves, and historical houses. There are a lot of opportunities in areas that are perhaps not ones you might think of right at the top of your head.”

Check out the full video below to learn more!

Resources:

Shedd Aquarium

Work at Shedd

Internships

How to Prepare Questions for the Winter Career Fair, With Examples

Tips for developing questions that will help you learn more about employers.

Guidance Provided By: The Handshake Team

Attending DePaul’s upcoming virtual Winter Career Fair (Feb 24) on Handshake will help you get an internship or job as employers focus on hiring students virtually. Virtual career fairs sessions are a great opportunity for you to connect with and learn more about the organizations hiring DePaul students. But how can you stand out to employers and make a great impression? One way is by showing up prepared and having thoughtful questions to ask. Here are some tips for prepping questions, and some examples to help get you started.

Learn about the employer

The first step is to do some research on the employer. Start by reading through their Handshake page, where you’ll get an overview of the organization, see student reviews, and check out the open jobs and internships. Then go through their company website and do an online search for recent news articles, press releases and other relevant information. 

Spending some time before the session to learn more will pay off because it shows the employer your interest in their organization and in getting a job. It’ll also keep you from asking something that is easily found on their Handshake page or website. If you go the extra mile and demonstrate that you’re informed, the employer ambassador will definitely be impressed!

Create a list of questions

Now that you have more information, you can start writing your list of questions. Take time to think about what interests you the most about this employer. What do you want to learn more about? What qualities are important to you in a potential employer? What will help you decide if they are a good fit for you? 

Make a list of your priorities and then fill in questions for each. It’s a good idea to have several questions for each session, in case some are answered by the employer before you have a chance to ask them.

When to ask a question

There are group and one-on-one sessions during virtual career fairs. If you’re attending a group session, make sure to wait for the host to announce that it’s time for questions. Depending on the session, you may have an opportunity to ask your question on video or type it into the chat. One-on-one sessions are an open conversation with the employer, so you should feel free to ask questions as you go. 

Examples of questions

Here are a few examples of questions you can ask during virtual sessions. These are inspiration to help you get started. It’s important to tailor your questions depending on the type of session and your unique interests. 

General employer questions

  • How would you describe the culture of the organization?
  • What is the office environment like? Is it formal or more casual?
  • How does leadership promote diversity and inclusion within the organization? 
  • What support, initiatives, and/or training around diversity and inclusion are available to employees (i.e. employee resource groups, mentorship programs, leadership development)?
  • Are there professional development opportunities?
  • Does the organization encourage employees to pursue advanced degrees? 

Questions about a specific team or job

  • What does success look like in this role? On this team?
  • How would you describe this team? The manager?
  • What are the opportunities for growth in this role? On this team?
  • Do managers encourage innovation and creativity? 
  • How do managers measure success for employees/interns?

Questions for one-on-one sessions

  • What do you like most about working for [employer]?
  • Do you participate in employee resource/social groups?
  • What other teams do you work closely with?
  • What is the best part of your job?
For more tips, check out our guide to attending virtual career fairs.

How to Prepare Your Virtual Career Fair “Elevator Pitch”

Learn how to create the perfect elevator pitch ahead of your next career fair – with examples!

Guidance Provided By: The Handshake Team

So, you’ve registered for the DePaul Winter virtual career fair. You’ve scoped out the attending employers, registered for a few group and 1:1 sessions, and you’re feeling excited about the connections you’re about to make. You’ve got your outfit picked out, you’ve chatted with your roommates about keeping quiet and avoiding distractions during the fair, and you’re hopeful that you’ll make a good impression and find the job or internship you’re dreaming about. So, what else can you do to prepare? It’s time to work on your elevator pitch.

One of the best things you can do ahead of any virtual event is to prepare a few talking points to succinctly make the case about why you’re a great candidate. The employers that you meet with want to learn more about you! So think of a short overview about your background, studies, and career goals. Practice with a friend or family member ahead of the virtual fair so you’re ready when it’s time to introduce yourself to a recruiter.

Ahead, read our tips for how to prepare an elevator pitch.

What is an elevator pitch?

An elevator pitch is essentially a short and sweet synopsis about yourself for a prospective employer. It’s called an elevator pitch because it’s meant to be brief enough to deliver convincingly during a quick elevator ride to your floor.

How long should my pitch be?

Think about the length of your average elevator ride. Not long, right? It’s a best practice to keep your elevator pitch to a minute or less! The key to an impactful elevator pitch is to stay short and sweet, avoid rambling, and prioritize truly pertinent information.

What should I include in my elevator pitch?

Focus on the skills and qualifications that’ll make you uniquely appealing to your audience. Give some top-level bullet points about what makes you an awesome candidate! 

  • Your field of study
  • A couple relevant skills or certifications
  • A nod to relevant experience 

Your elevator pitch should also touch on your professional goals: if you hope to find a job at a mission-driven startup, or want to relocate to Denver, or aim for a role where you’ll flex your coding skills, mention these. 

If you plan to meet with a few different types of employers during your career fair, don’t be afraid to tailor your pitch to different industries and roles. For example, your proficiency in Photoshop might not be relevant to a corporate sales role, but it is for marketing! Be aware of your audience. 

How to deliver an elevator pitch

When it comes to your elevator pitch, practice makes perfect. You might feel silly running through a 30-second spiel about yourself, but becoming confident in your delivery can make a huge difference when you’re face-to-face with a recruiter! Aim for your pitch to be brief, persuasive, and confident—not boastful. Ask a trusted friend or family member to run through your pitch with you a few times, give constructive feedback, and help you nail it! 

How should I wrap up after my pitch?

Typically, it’s a best practice to have a business card or a copy of your resume to hand to somebody after delivering your IRL elevator pitch during a career fair. However, since you’ll be meeting recruiters during virtual fairs, have a link to your Handshake profile handy to send via chat! If relevant, you can also share a digital portfolio during this time.

Elevator pitch examples:

  • “I’m Brinton and I just graduated DePaul University with a degree in English! I’ve worked as a freelance writer for lifestyle publications like Bustle for the past two years, and now I’m looking to grow as a full-time reporter in the entertainment, travel, or breaking news space. I’m proficient in Photoshop, certified in Google Analytics, and have experience managing social media channels for small businesses.”
  • “I’m Luke, and I’m a software engineer with a background working with high-growth e-commerce startups in the Chicago area. However, now I am looking for an opportunity that will bring me closer to my family and friends in Raleigh. I specialize in iOS and have four years of experience writing C++ code in a POSIX environment.”
  • “I’m Rey, and I’m a rising senior at DePaul University. I’m studying finance and spent last summer as an analyst for Goldman Sachs, where I focused mainly on comparative financial performance analysis. Now that I’m graduating in June, I’m hoping to find a full-time role as an investment banking analyst.”

Meet Peter Wild Crea, Rehabilitation Aide at Athletico

The Health Care & Science (HCS) Career Community wants to introduce students to a wide range of careers from popular clinical roles (e.g., nurse, physician, veterinarian) to jobs like healthcare data analytics, health administration, or biotech research.  

Today, we want to highlight a fantastic job seen on the resumes of numerous DePaul students: Rehabilitation Assistant or Aide at Athletico. In a recent virtual interview, Debbie Kaltman (HCS Employer Engagement Specialist) met with Peter Wild Crea (DePaul ‘22, Health Sciences) to discuss his educational experiences, career journey, and insights for students interested in clinical health professions. 

As a current pre-med student at DePaul, Peter’s passion for health and patient care allowed him to explore many opportunities on and off campus. Shadowing a physical therapist at Athletico led to a job as a Rehabilitation Aide in which Peter has a wide range of responsibilities, including patient support, sanitation, and administrative work. Through this role, Peter builds close relationships with patients, learns about the human body and healthcare systems, and gains valuable clinical experience. Additionally, Peter continues to create opportunities for himself and develop his skills as a Peer Health Educator and student organization leader in order to prepare for a future in medical school.

A valuable token of advice from Peter for fellow students: “Lead with your passion, but also allow your passions to change.”

Check out the full video below to learn more!

Check out employment opportunities at Athletico here.

50+ Black-Owned and Led Companies to Follow

Dozens of Black-owned and Black-led companies hire students and recent alumni on Handshake. Follow these companies to discover your next career move.

Guidance Provided By: The Handshake Team

Below is listed 50+ Black-owned or Black-led (Black CEO) companies across diverse industries that have hired students who are on the Handshake network. This list includes Fortune 500 companiesdozens of fast-growing startups, and non-profit leaders. Explore this list, then log into Handshake and search for the companies you’re interested in. Hit “Follow” to receive notifications about upcoming opportunities. You can also reach out to peers on the Handshake network who have worked at these companies for more information.

NameIndustryHeadquarters
Acta Non Verba: Youth Urban Farm ProjectFarming, Ranching and FishingCalifornia
Ariel InvestmentsInvestment / Portfolio ManagementIllinois
Baldwin Richardson Foods Co.CPG – Consumer Packaged GoodsIllinois
BCT PartnersManagement ConsultingNew Jersey
Black Aids InstituteNon-ProfitCalifornia
Black Girls CODENon-ProfitCalifornia
Black Women’s BlueprintNon-ProfitNew York
BlavityJournalism, Media & PublishingCalifornia
Bridgewaters InteriorsManufacturingMichigan
CastleOak Securities, L.P.Investment BankingNew York
Chemico, LLCOther IndustriesMichigan
Citizens Savings BankCommercial Banking & CreditMississippi
Cipher Skin Inc.Other IndustriesColorado
Color of ChangeNon-ProfitCalifornia
Daymond John – The Shark GroupAdvertising, PR & MarketingNew York
Destiny Arts CenterNon-ProfitCalifornia
Diversant, LLCHuman ResourcesCalifornia
Epitec, IncOther IndustriesMichigan
Equal Justice InitiativeNon-ProfitAlabama
Fair Oaks Farms (Wisconsin)Food & BeveragesWisconsin
Girls for a ChangeNon-ProfitVirginia
Global Commerce and ServicesInternet & SoftwareLouisiana
GN BankCommercial Banking & CreditIllinois
Harvey B. Gantt Center for African American Arts + CulturePerforming and Fine ArtsNorth Carolina
JOURNiOther EducationMichigan
KairosNon-ProfitOregon
Loops Capital Markets, LLCInvestment BankingIllinois
Merck & Co., IncPharmaceuticalsNew Jersey
My Brother’s KeeperNon-ProfitMassachusetts
NAACPGovernment – Local, State & FederalMaryland
NAACP LDFNon-ProfitNew York
National Urban LeagueNon-ProfitNew York
Nightlight Pediatric Urgent CareHealthcareTexas
OneUnited BankAdvertising, PR & MarketingMassachussetts
O, The Oprah Magazine (Hearst)Journalism, Media & PublishingNew York
Pharos Capital GroupInvestment / Portfolio ManagementTexas
PindropInternet & SoftwareGeorgia
Rocket LawyerInternet & SoftwareCalifornia, Utah
Siebert Cisneros Shank & Co., LLCInvestment BankingNew York
Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureTourismDistrict of Columbia
Tapestry, Inc.FashionNew York
TaskRabbitInternet & SoftwareCalifornia
The Anderson-DuBose CompanyTransportation & LogisticsOhio
The Essie Justice GroupNon-ProfitCalifornia
The Innocence ProjectNon-ProfitNew York
Thompson Hospitality GroupRestaurants & Food ServicesVirginia
TIAAInvestment / Portfolio ManagementNew York
Uncharted PowerUtilities and RenewablesNew York
Vista Equity PartnersInvestment / Portfolio ManagementTexas
World Wide TechnologyComputer NetworkingMissouri
Zume PizzaRestaurants & Food ServicesCalifornia

Attending The Winter Virtual Career Fair? Here Are 10 Tips You Need to Know

Your guide to preparing for virtual career fairs and making a great impression with recruiters.

Guidance Provided By: The Handshake Team

Attending a virtual career fair on Handshake will give you an edge in landing that next job or internship. Employers who attend the fair want to hire DePaul students—and they’ll host virtual sessions to find the students they want to interview. With our virtual Winter Career Fair 2021 on the horizon (Feb 24), here are some tips for putting your best foot forward—before, during and after the virtual fair.

Preparing for a virtual fair

1. Update your Handshake profile. The first step in preparing for virtual fairs is to make sure your Handshake profile is complete and up-to-date. Your Handshake profile helps you get personalized recommendations for upcoming virtual events. Plus, employers use profile fields to find students to invite to their sessions. Don’t let an incomplete or out-of-date profile keep you from getting discovered by recruiters.

  • Check that the basics are accurate: graduation date, school year, major, GPA and work authorization
  • Select the job types, locations and roles that interest you, so recruiters know which jobs and internships are a good fit for you.
  • Add your courses, skills, and any previous work experience.

2. Find out which employers are attending. View the virtual fair details page to see the full list of employers who are hosting sessions. From there, you can click through to each employer’s Handshake page to learn more about them and read reviews from other students. Be sure to sign up early for sessions with the employers you like so you’re guaranteed a spot.

3. Research the employers you’ll meet. When you sign up to attend an employer’s virtual fair session, research beyond their Handshake profile. Check out their company website and search online for recent news articles and other relevant information. This will help you think of questions to ask during sessions, and make conversation during one-on-one sessions you may have.

4. Prepare a few talking points. The employers that you meet with want to learn more about you! So think of an “elevator pitch” about yourself—a short overview about your background, studies, and career goals. Practice with a friend or family member so you’re ready when it’s time to introduce yourself to a recruiter.

On the day of the virtual fair

5. Dress professionally. Even though you won’t be meeting employers in person, you’ll want to ditch the sweats for the career fair. Dressing up a bit will make a good first impression with recruiters and employees. Plus, wearing your favorite polished outfit will help boost your confidence in time for the event! 

6. Find a quiet spot and a neutral background. Try to limit potential distractions for yourself and for the recruiters. Plan where you will be sitting during the event ahead of time—make sure it’s quiet and there is a plain background behind you. Keep the recruiter’s eye focused on you. 

During your virtual sessions

7. Arrive on time. It’s very important to show up at your selected session start time. Being on time shows the recruiter or employee ambassador that you’re dependable and respectful of their time as well.

8. Maintain eye contact and practice active listening. Consider smiling and nodding occasionally as you would during an in-person conversation. Limit any distractions around you so that you’re not tempted to look away from your computer screen.

9. Ask questions. Bring a list of prepared questions for each session. Having several questions ready will help you in case one or more of the questions are answered early by the employer. Have a pen and paper with you so you can jot down new questions that you think of during the conversation.

The day after the fair

10. View and apply to open jobs or internships. Keep the momentum going from your meetings with employers. Check out their page on Handshake to see current jobs and internships. Recruiters are logging into Handshake daily to find students for open jobs—so it’s the best place to apply! If you’re not ready to apply yet, save the jobs you like so you’ll get notifications to apply before the deadlines. Find tips for applying to jobs on Handshake here.